End to Child Labour & a new start to life long learning
In India, child labour has been illegal under the nation’s Child Labour Act since 1986 yet it still has one of the highest numbers of child labourers worldwide.
At 14 years of age, Vaishali Ganpat Chaudhari was a young woman who was forced to work to support herself and her mother after the pair left Vaishali’s alcoholic and abusive father.
For many children forced into work, they don’t understand their rights and are often not in a position to speak out for themselves.
Since 2009, UNICEF has been working in Maharashtra, India, to stop child labour practices. In three districts, UNICEF has helped children like Vaishali leave the working conditions they are in and support them to re-enrol in schools. - UNICEF has not been alone in this task.
Since returning to classes this year, Nilesh, 9, is now a regular at school and starting to learn how to concentrate on his studies.
Ganesh Palepawar, 10, too has been supported to catch up on his studies. UNICEF, along with local partner organisations, has been provided with textbooks, notebooks and stationery.
When a child protection worker met with Nilesh, Ganesh approached her and asked to be helped. Ganesh belongs to the Madgi community, a scheduled caste, and is the son of landless agricultural labourers.
When a child protection worker met with Nilesh, Ganesh approached her and asked to be helped. Ganesh belongs to the Madgi community, a scheduled caste, and is the son of landless agricultural labourers.
In the villages where Nilesh and Ganesh live, UNICEF and its local partners are working, an estimated 250 of the 350 identified working children have returned to school.
Child protection worker Geeta Madeshwar said regardless of his standing, it is the responsibility of a village group to protect children while their parents are working in the fields.
An estimated 215 million children head out to work every day despite international laws to prevent child labour and worldwide campaigns calling for consumer power to end child labour practices.
At 14 years of age, Vaishali Ganpat Chaudhari was a young woman who was forced to work to support herself and her mother after the pair left Vaishali’s alcoholic and abusive father.
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