Global Handwashing Day 2009
Global Handwashing Day engages schoolchildren as agents for change. The introduction of water, sanitation and hygiene interventions in schools, including handwashing with soap, is an entry point for children to take good hygiene practices to their homes
Diarrhoea kills 1000 children below five years every day. Handwashing with soap reduces diarrhoeal deaths by 40 per cent and is the most inexpensive way to prevent diarrhoea
Water alone is not enough. Washing hands with soap and water especially at the critical times after using the toilet and before handling food helps reduce the incidence of diarrhoeal disease (Children washing their hands at a anganwadi centre in Bihar)
Handwashing with soap represents a cornerstone of public health and can be considered an affordable, accessible “do-it-yourself” vaccine. (With help of child cabinet members, children line up to wash their hands before having lunch, at a school in Bihar)
Washing hands with soap and water reduces respiratory infections by 25 percent and is recommended as a critical action to prevent spread of influenza H1N1. (Children perform sanitary practices at the anganwadi centre in Mehsana District of Gujarat)
Washing hands with soap and water reduces respiratory infections by 25 percent and is recommended as a critical action to prevent spread of influenza H1N1. (Children perform sanitary practices at the anganwadi centre in Mehsana District of Gujarat)
Indian cricket great Sachin Tendulkar shows the correct way to wash hands to children and media on the Global Hand Washing Day.
Toilet use can reduce diarrhoeal deaths but toilet usage in India is still low with less than third of the population using toilets. This is showing an upward trend because of the Government's Total Sanitation Campaign. (A child defecates in open in Bihar)
Total Sanitation Campaign has led to 18,020 village panchayats being declared open defecation free, a milestone being celebrated by the government on 17 November. (Children perform sanitary practice of using toilet and washing hands at a school in Gujarat)
Girls do their morning chores at Pahla Kadam residential school in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh. Except for 3 per cent of girls, rest of students used toilet for first time in their lives. 10 per cent of girls persuaded parents to build toilets in their houses.
Improved sanitation and hygiene programmes combined with handwashing education directly impact the Millennium Development Goals of universal primary education and gender equality via higher enrolment, attendance and retention rates in schools for both girls and boys.
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