Introduction

The relatively new state of Chhattisgarh was formed in 2000 by carving out 16 Chhattisgarhi-speaking south-eastern districts from the state of Madhya Pradesh. Chhattisgarh is the 10th largest state in terms of geographical area, the third largest in terms of forest area and has the second largest mineral reserves. The state has a population of 26 million, more than three-quarters of whom live in rural and remote areas. The population density is 189 people per kilometre lower than the national density rate of 382 per sq km , making it one of least densely populated states in India, ranking 26th. The sex ratio of 964 females for 1000 males is higher than the all-India sex ratio of 914. The literacy rate in Chhattisgarh has improved steadily from 42.91 per cent in 1991 to 64.7 per cent in 2001, to 71 per cent in 2011. The state has experienced a modest, but consistently positive growth in Gross State Domestic Product (GsDP). Chhattisgarh ranks 23rd in Human Development Index 2007-08 (HDI) out of 23. Of the total population of 26 million, 43.4 per cent represent scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, who live mostly in the thickly forested areas in the north and south of the state, and are largely involved in small-scale farming. As most of Chhattisgarhs disadvantaged people live in remote forested districts, they remain poorly served and show lower levels of development. Chhattisgarh is identified as one of the richest biodiversity habitats in India and has one of the most dense forest covers in the country. Rich in wildlife, the state is home to several species of exotic flora and fauna and abundant non-timber forest products, with tremendous potential for value addition. Chhattisgarh is endowed with a rich cultural heritage that includes its varie ... Read More...

Challenges and Opportunities
The greatest challenges for Chhattisgarhare wide disparities in terms of gender, geographical location, civil strife, rural-urban anda widening gap in the availability of human resources. According to recent health statistics, the infant mortality rate is 46 deaths per 1000 live births, the maternal mortality rate is 269, and the total fertility rate is 2.7. There is need to scale up efforts to achieve development goals by putting efforts using the strategies in Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health (RMNCH+A). Malnutrition in the state has been a concern as the recent NFHS-3 data shows that th ... Read More...
UNICEF in Action
UNICEF is playing a significant role in the implementation of maternal and child health interventions in Chhattisgarh by building and strengthening partnerships with medical colleges and other technical institutes. To effectively reduce the Infant Mortality Rate, both components of child health community and institution-based care need to be developed simultaneously. Anaemia continues to be one of the key challenges contributing to the states maternal and neonatal mortality in the antenatal and the postnatal care period. UNICEF has begun strengthening the quality of Antenatal Care (ANC) services undertaken by Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANM) by providing ANC kits with the introduction of haemoglobin colour scales and a four-day training package for ANMs in the high priority districts. This is now being scaled up to all districts. ... Read More...
 
 
 
 
 
 
Find us on Facebook